Artefact Cards Blog

Empathy Mapping with LEGO Minifigs

Posted 18 February 2014 by John Willshire

I've been a huge fan of the principles of Empathy Mapping since I first read about it in Gamestorming (by Dave Gray, Sunni Brown & James Macanufo) a few years ago.

It's very simple to do - make up a person in the middle of the page who is your customer, think about them when they're in the market you're operating in, and start to flesh out their life in relation to what you do. 

What do they think and feel?  See?  Say and do?  What do they hear?  Then think about what causes them pain in the market, and ways in which you might create littles gains for them.

 

 

Compared to things like demographics, segmentations, or audience profiling, I find this a much more useful way to get people in workshops thinking about an audience for two reasons.

Firstly, the teams who create these people tend to co-create them.  They might initially be rooted in a real person that somebody knows, but they will be embellished by the group to round out the personality. 

And because the teams create them together, they all start talking about them as if they know them.  It also stops people debating about what is implied by a broad, bland target audience definition.

Secondly, because the people on the Empathy Map are more 'rounded' than typical audience profiles, the ideas people in workshops create to solve their problems tend to be more interesting, away from the generic centre ground.

Lately, I've been interested in pushing people even further from the centre in this type of workshop (partly inspired by Brian Millar's ideas on Extreme Consumers). 

What happens when you place weird users in the middle of Empathy Maps?  And how do you get groups of people to come up with weirder than normal people?

I found the answer, as with many things in life, in LEGO...

When I was a kid, LEGO minifigs weren't that exciting, to be honest. 

Yes, there were knights and spacemen.  Possibly emergency services.  But the boring old normal LEGO minifigs had plain blue tops, red trousers and so on.  There was perhaps one type of hair they could have.  It was all pretty standard.

Nowadays though, if you go rifling through the 'make your own minifigs' bin in a LEGO shop, you'll be hard pressed not to find a piece that doesn't have some sort of weirdness to it. 

A prisoner's jacket, mermaid tail, surfer vest, bullet belt, lumberjack shirt... I can't keep listing them of course, due to the sheer variety.

Which makes LEGO minifigs really handy to create 'weird users' to create products and services for.

I used this approach most recently during a three-day workshop in Brighton; it was part of a longer mobile product innovation programme I've designed with Mark Earls and James Haycock and his guys from Adaptive Lab.  

We did it on the morning of day two, though in hindsight we could have gone earlier with it in the process, as soon as the teams had formed.

To run it, we used a pile of minifig pieces, and a pile of Artefact Cards to build up stories around them.  Now, you may have loads of minifigs lying around, but it's good to buy a selection fit for purpose perhaps. 

I bought a big pile of minifigs from the LEGO store in Brighton (thanks to Alice there for being amazingly helpful).  We had teams of five people so provided each table with ten heads, bodies, legs, hats/hair, and accesories. 

NB - unfortunately, your typical LEGO bin is a poor representation of the world when it comes to a male/female split.  I searched as hard as I could for female heads etc, and only ended up with around ten out of the fifty possible minifigs being female.  Hopefully this will change soon with things like this letter.

With an average of two potential minifigs per workshop particpant, it meant that there was enough for people to choose from, but not so much that they could keep circling through parts until they found 'easy options'.

This was important because the participants were asked not to ignore the weird bits on the minifigs they built, but to make them an integral part of that customer through the use of metaphor. 

The questions from Empathy Mapping (what are they feeling, doing etc) become the ways in which you get people to create little stories around the minifigs.

Why, for instance, would somebody be carrying a shield?

Or why, for instance, is someone who's got a belt full of bullets looking so worried and anxious?

At the end of the process, because each team member created a minifig, and the associated stories around them on the Artefact Cards, each team ended up with a really interesting mix of customers and stories in the middle of the table to design solutions for. 

The soutions had to take into account that they would be for different types of people, so avoided some of the one-dimensional focus that some Empathy Mapping sessions can result in.  But because the types of people were be so wildly different in each team, the teams had to become more creative at thinking about what sort of products they would design for their 'weird audience'. 

Having the little stories on the Artefact Cards proved really useful, as they good be grouped, rearranged, kept and redealt all through the remaining days of the workshop, depending on what form the latest solutions being created would take.

All the ideas that came out by the end were tied back to the users as defined in this exercise, even to the extent that they were used in the majority of the presentations as little 'user talismen'. 

A lot of them now live on the desks of the clients as well, which is a lovely, unintended consequence of the experiment.

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I'd be really interested in hearing from others who try this approach out, or who use Empathy Mapping or LEGO for workshops already, as it seems to be both a really fertile and really fun way to think user-first in workshops.  We all found it highly productive and playful, and hope you might too.

Posted in empathy, empathy mapping, gamestorming, UX, visual thinking, workshops

JARVIS1, meet JARVIS2

Posted 9 January 2014 by

A new addition to the ever increasing army of cameras… a Logitech 930e on a gorrillapod tripod, for use as a portable desk projector for Artefact Cards.

A little brother to the desk camera.  First test run tomorrow.

JARVIS 2 Screen Shot 2014-01-09 at 20.44.20

       

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Posted in Artefact, Artefact Cards, blank cards, brainstorms, cards, visu, vizthinking, wireframing, workshops

Superheroes, Origin Stories and Artefact Cards

Posted 3 October 2013 by John Willshire

My talk today from Best of Britannia, a show of the finest in British Design and Manufacturing.  It's about Origin Stories, both from the perspective of the retelling of Superhero stories, and the power of making things in Britain:

 

Superheroes, Origin Stories & Artefact Cards - Best Of Britannia 2013 from John V Willshire
We're also running a wee Artefact stall there over Thursday, Friday and Saturday, so if you're in the area (four minutes from Farringdon Station) then please pop in and say hello (we're on the second floor):

Posted in Artefact, Artefact Cards, artefactcards, batman, batman begins, blank cards, brainstorms, cards, design, drawing, man of steel, superhero, superman, visual thinking, workshops

Don’t meet your heroes. Work with them. Presenting Artefact Cards for Hiut Denim…

Posted 23 August 2013 by Shopify API

David at Hiut Denim asked me earlier in the year “would you like to do something together for our second year book?”  I eagerly said yes.

Fast forward a couple on months, and the new year book has just landed on my desk.

Year Book - On Desk

At the back, there’s this: “A small shop of products that we curate to show off those that we think do their one thing well”

Year Book - Open

And in there, you’ll find the limited edition Hiut Artefact Cards:

Year Book - Artefact Cards

You would not believe how long I sat and just looked at that page.  Yeah, I know.

There’s something about the red and yellow that just works.  It’s rhuburb and custard, perhaps.  They’re my favourite ever Artefact Boxes.

Hiut Artefact Pack Shot

They’re available now, from the Hiut Shop:

http://bit.ly/1aycNAY

Got get some before I buy them all back myself.

       

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Posted in Artefact, Artefact Cards, blank cards, brainstorms, cards, visu, vizthinking, wireframing, workshops

“It’s Genius; it’s Moleskine for Post-its”

Posted 21 August 2013 by Shopify API

“It’s genius, it’s Moleskine for Post-its”

So said Matt Sadler, my friend and fellow graduate of the IPA Excellence Diploma’ of Artefact Cards, as we caught up for the first time in AGES tonight.

I liked that so much, I made him write it down. Then put his face very close to it.

20130821-210439.jpg

We were down at the launch of an initiative at The Bakery, which has been started by Alex Dunsdon & friends; Alex is another friend of ours from the Excellence Diploma. The Bakery brings together brands, agencies and technology companies, to try and solve problems consumers have with technology, rather than just use it to deliver advertising.

MTPW > MPWT, etc.

Anyway, the two things together (“Moleskine for Post-its” and Tech startups) made me remember a conversation that Mark Earls, Tim Milne and I were having yesterday, about one of the subjects around Mark’s new book he’s writing.

When people are pitching new tech startups to people, they tend to throw together two familiar things to make an unfamiliar thing. It’s Last.FM for Running. It’s Etsy for Auto Parts. It’s Mailbox for Calendars. It’s Instagram for Video. It’s X for Y.

Anyway, there’s probably a clear formula to use.

It’s [POPULAR THING] for [BROKEN THING]

And it’s all out the “Cut Up Technique” play book, of which Artefact Cards a definitely of the school of. Cut Up Technique is basically where you take an existing body of text (or images)’ cut through them all, and start rearranging to find new combinations.

It’s what the brilliant William S Burroughs quote “When You Cut Into The Present The Future Leaks Out” refers to. Cut into what exists, reorder, and see what might exist in the future.

Try it tomorrow. Write down lots of popular things in culture, and a set of broken things around the thing you’re working on. Then mix them all up, and see what you can create.

       

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Posted in Artefact, Artefact Cards, blank cards, brainstorms, cards, visu, vizthinking, wireframing, workshops

New Box - our final prototype

Posted 19 August 2013 by John Willshire

After what must be nearly three months of work, we've cracked the new box prototype. 

To say we're delighted would be an understatement.

Into production very soon, expect them in September...

Posted in Artefact, Artefact Cards, artefactcards, blank cards, brainstorms, cards, design, drawing, play, UX, UXcafe, visual thinking, wireframing, workshops

Artefact Cards - 10 minute talk at UXCafe

Posted 16 August 2013 by John Willshire


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Posted in Artefact, Artefact Cards, artefactcards, blank cards, brainstorms, cards, design, drawing, UX, UXcafe, visual thinking, vizthinking, wireframing, workshops